Sentimental value

It's been three years since I've seen my second quilt, Star Stories.

On my last week at the library, I asked Lexie if she could bring in her quilt so I could finally have a full photo of it. This is Star Stories, three years later, after use and love.

For the archive page about the quilt, see domesticat.net/quilts/star-stories

For an excellent full write-up of what this quilt was, and why the fabrics had meaning, see domesticat.net/2009/10/quilt-festival-story-star-stories cnaStar Stories ... three years later

I always have a fear of looking at my finished work. I can always find the mistakes, and in Star Stories I know I made many. I've learned a great deal since I made it, but it was the quilt that sparked my interest in using reclaimed, shared, and repurposed fabrics. Forget what's "expected." In this case, sentimental value was more important.

The quilt was displayed at Lexie's wedding reception, even though it wasn't finished; I raced to get it completed and sent off, and in my haste I never thought to get a straightforward photo of it. (What can I say? It was only my second quilt. I had no idea I'd stick with this hobby.)

It was comprised of an elegant square block that, when turned sideways, created tumbling stars. Since most of the fabric in the quilt was donated (read: not really chosen by me) the color choices were out of my hands. I remember stressing a great deal over how to arrange the fabric; I tried a color-spectrum first and it just didn't work. The dark-to-light gradient, on the other hand, was simple and perfect -- and looked SO much more complex than it really was.

Dark side

On my last week at the library, I asked Lexie if she could bring in her quilt so I could finally have a full photo of it. This is Star Stories, three years later, after use and love.

For the archive page about the quilt, see domesticat.net/quilts/star-stories

For an excellent full write-up of what this quilt was, and why the fabrics had meaning, see domesticat.net/2009/10/quilt-festival-story-star-stories cnaTop left

On my last week at the library, I asked Lexie if she could bring in her quilt so I could finally have a full photo of it. This is Star Stories, three years later, after use and love.

For the archive page about the quilt, see domesticat.net/quilts/star-stories

For an excellent full write-up of what this quilt was, and why the fabrics had meaning, see domesticat.net/2009/10/quilt-festival-story-star-stories cnaMiddle left

Light side

On my last week at the library, I asked Lexie if she could bring in her quilt so I could finally have a full photo of it. This is Star Stories, three years later, after use and love.

For the archive page about the quilt, see domesticat.net/quilts/star-stories

For an excellent full write-up of what this quilt was, and why the fabrics had meaning, see domesticat.net/2009/10/quilt-festival-story-star-stories cnaTop right

On my last week at the library, I asked Lexie if she could bring in her quilt so I could finally have a full photo of it. This is Star Stories, three years later, after use and love.

For the archive page about the quilt, see domesticat.net/quilts/star-stories

For an excellent full write-up of what this quilt was, and why the fabrics had meaning, see domesticat.net/2009/10/quilt-festival-story-star-stories cnaMiddle right

On my last week at the library, I asked Lexie if she could bring in her quilt so I could finally have a full photo of it. This is Star Stories, three years later, after use and love.

For the archive page about the quilt, see domesticat.net/quilts/star-stories

For an excellent full write-up of what this quilt was, and why the fabrics had meaning, see domesticat.net/2009/10/quilt-festival-story-star-stories cnaBottom right

I know there are mistakes. I wince when I think about them. I've never sent out a perfect quilt, and every time I start a project I think, "This will be the time I get it right!" and ... it never happens. I fudge a seam, I goof on color arrangement, or my corners aren't perfect. Maybe the recipients notice, and maybe they don't. I have to grit my teeth when I give a quilt away, and trust that the gestalt overrides the flaws.

Imperfect warmth beats cold perfection.

Still, though, I look at this quilt and I smile. I smile BRIGHTLY. My first thought when they held it up? "Cheeky woman." Seriously -- had I known what I was getting into, I would have been terrified to start. For a second quilt, this is audacious as all hell. Good thing I didn't know it at the time.

Start as you mean to continue, I guess.

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Comments

Damned amazing work, Amy!

I still have HOLY SHIT I DID THAT? syndrome where this quilt is concerned. :D

Trust me- I have never noticed a mistake on this quilt!  Only that it's bright, colorful, full of love, and super snuggly :)

But that's the whole pont of a quilt. It is love and memories and moments and imperfect perfectness. There are no mistakes, only heart. Real qulits are love. <3 :) :) :)

Honey, the thing you have to remember is that even if you know the mistakes are there and maybe even if you can see them, no one else will. Learned that a long time ago with my knitting. It's beautiful <3

October 11, 2011